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Prize Lectures
  • Gruber Prize Lecture
  • Speaker:
    Dr. Frank Eisenhauer (Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics)
    Title:
    A New Era of High Angular Resolution Astronomy
    When:
    3 August (Wednesday) 12:15 – 13:15
    Where:
    Auditorium, BEXCO, Busan


    Dr. Frank Eisenhauer is senior staff scientist at the Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Garching near Munich, where he is leading the development and science exploration of large astronomical instruments and experiments. The Gruber Cosmology Prize 2022 recognizes Frank Eisenhauer for the development of the GRAVITY and SINFONI instruments that collected seemingly irrefutable evidence for the existence of a black hole at the center of our galaxy. The results include the precise measurements of Sgr A*’s general relativistic influence on the orbit of the star S2, and the observations of gas orbiting close to the “last stable orbit” – the point before which it succumbs to the gravitational tug of Sgr A*. Following his studies of physics at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), he started his Master- and PhD theses with Reinhard Genzel at MPE, where he continued his scientific career to date. Frank Eisenhauer is also Adjunct Teaching Professor at TUM. Over the years his experimental focus moved from adaptive optics imaging, to integral field spectroscopy, and now optical/IR interferometry, always with the goal of ever better understanding of the physics of black holes and their environment.

    https://www.iau.org/news/pressreleases/detail/iau2203/
  • Kavli Prize Lecture
  • Speaker:
    Prof. Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard (Aarhus University)
    Prof. Conny Aerts (KU Leuven & Radboud University)
    Prof. Roger Ulrich (UCLA)
    Title:
    The historical road and future path of helio- and asteroseismology
    When:
    4 August (Thursday) 12:15 – 13:15
    Where:
    Auditorium, BEXCO, Busan


    Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard is, from 1 July 2022, Professor Emeritus at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, and he heads the Stellar Astrophysics Centre, funded by the Danish National Research Foundation. He received a PhD in Astrophysics from Cambridge University. He has contributed to the development of helio- and asteroseismology from the inception of these fields, including work on stellar modelling and data analysis techniques involving frequency fitting and inverse analyses of seismic data. In addition, he took part in the establishment of ground- and space-based instrumentation for helio- and asteroseismology, including contributions to the definition of the SoHO satellite. He has had overall responsibility for the asteroseismic use of data from the NASA Kepler and TESS missions, with the establishment of the Kepler and TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortia. He served as Danish delegate on the ESA Science Programme Committee and, for one year, as its president.


    Conny Aerts is Full Professor of Astrophysics at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Belgium, as well as Part-time Professor of Asteroseismology at the Radboud University Nijmegen, NL and External Scientific Member of the Max Planck Society in Heidelberg, Germany. She earned an MSc degree in Mathematics from Antwerp University and a PhD from KU Leuven. She contributed to the development of asteroseismology, with emphasis on fast rotators and massive stars relying on ground- and spacebased data. Her work involves instrumentation, data analysis, and methodology for both the identification of nonradial oscillation modes and asteroseismic modelling. She provided personal supervision to 45 MSc and 40 PhD students, in addition to 15 externally recruited postdocs so far. Aside from her participation in numerous international committees and advisory boards, she lectures various BSc and MSc courses annually, leads numerous outreach initiatives focusing on gender in STEM, and is Belgian PI of the PLATO space mission.


    Roger Ulrich is Research Professor of Astronomy at UCLA. He received his PhD from UC Berkeley from the Department of Astronomy under Louis Henyey in 1969. After receiving his PhD, he went to Cal Tech and began a collaboration with John Bahcall studying solar neutrino fluxes that lasted years. His interest in the solar 5-minute oscillations began with observations by fellow graduate student Ed Frazier which showed that the oscillatory motion was disrupted by convection cells rather than being generated. Based on that clue, he carried out a modal analysis of a solar envelope. Ulrich with the assistance of Edward Rhodes, Jr. and independently by Franz Deubner confirmed that prediction using new instrumentation that measured 2-dimensional grids of the velocity at regular time intervals for a duration of hours. He was appointed Assistant Professor at UCLA and remained there until he retired in 2008. In 1986 he began managing the 150-foot solar tower telescope on Mt. Wilson and continues to analyze data acquired from that system.

    This lecture is given by Prof. Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard on behalf of the three recipients of the Kavli Prize in Astrophysics 2022.

    https://www.iau.org/news/pressreleases/detail/iau2205/
  • Shaw Prize Lecture
  • Speaker:
    Prof. Lennart Lindegren (Lund University)
    Prof. Michael Perryman (European Space Agency)
    Title:
    Gaia and global space astrometry: A historical perspective
    When:
    10 August (Wednesday) 12:15 - 13:15
    Where:
    Auditorium, BEXCO, Busan


    Lennart Lindegren is Professor Emeritus at the Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics at Lund University, Sweden. He was a member of the European Space Agency’s Hipparcos Science Team (1976–1997) and the Gaia Science Advisory Group (1997–2000). Since 2001 he is a member of ESA's Gaia Science Team. His many studies of the technical and mathematical aspects of space astrometry have helped to shape both missions. Within the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium he leads the scientific implementation of the core astrometric solution.


    Michael Perryman was ESA's Project Scientist for the full duration of the Hipparcos mission (1980-1997). In 1993 he proposed, together with Lindegren, an ambitious follow-up mission to Hipparcos which eventually developed into Gaia, accepted by ESA in 2000. Perryman was the project scientist for Gaia from its inception to his retirement from ESA in 2009. He received a degree in mathematics and theoretical physics, and a PhD in astrophysics, from the University of Cambridge, and today is Adjunct Professor of the University College Dublin.

    This lecture is given by Prof. Lindegren on behalf of both recipients of the Shaw Prize in Astronomy 2022.

    https://www.iau.org/news/pressreleases/detail/iau2204/


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